Published on January 22, 2014 | by Laure Fourquet

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A quarter of young people in the UK still live at home

a graph showing the increase in the number of young people living at home is increasing

Office for National Statistics shows just how much the number of young people living at home is increasing [ONS]

A new report by The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has shown the number of adults aged 20 to 34 still living with their parents has increased to 25 per cent (or 669,000).

Official figures provide evidence that young people are strongly suffering from the economic situation, with a total of 3.3 million living with their parents in 2013.

The rise in university tuition fees has fuelled the biggest increase in the cost of living for students, encouraging them to either stay with their parents or to attend universities closer to home.

Official figures provide evidence that young people are strongly suffering from the economic situation

“My loan wouldn’t cover my rent for a year in halls and me and my parents felt it was a bit risky for me to move to London and rely on getting a job just to get me through the year,” explained Jessica Sandwell, who was doing a Fashion Photography degree at LCF.

“And because I stayed at home, my loan was even smaller – it only just covered my travel per term so I still had to work part-time, and commute to uni. This didn’t give me a whole lot of time in between, and I struggled really badly,” she added.

Defeating the point

One LCC student explained that he lied on his student application to receive the full amount of student loan: “If I declared that I was living at home I would have gotten a much smaller loan. With the travel and living expenses it would have cost as much money as living in London, which defeated the point of living with my parents.”

With 65% of men and 52% of women aged 20 living at home in 2013, the ONS’s report sheds light on an ongoing issue that numerous young people, especially from the creative industries, seem to be facing.

“I ended up squatting for a short while in a disused school. There was no hot water and if you went out you didn’t know if you would be evicted by the time you got back.” Simon Childs

Simon Childs, who graduated from LCC with a Masters in Journalism in 2012, explained to Arts London News his journey from his parent’s house to a squat in the heart of the city:

“I had to stay with my parents. Good luck to any freelance workers – or frankly anyone starting out in the world of work – without that option. I ended up squatting for a short while in a disused school. There was no hot water and if you went out you didn’t know if you would be evicted by the time you got back.”

He added: “Having your own place shouldn’t be some out of reach aspiration that’s only available to the successful.”

The full report of the Office for National Statistics is available here.

 

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